How Many Bones Make Up The Human Body?

How Many Bones Make Up The Human Body

The human body is a fascinating machine. It’s made up of many intricately connected parts, all working together to produce the actions we take every day. There are many ways to answer this question, but one of the most interesting ways is by breaking down the human body into its individual bones. The human body has around 206 bones in total. This figure may seem high but when you consider the complexity and range of actions that our bones enable us to do, it’s not so surprising after all. With so many different bones throughout the body, this article takes a closer look at just how many bones make up the human body and what each of them does…

How Many Bones Make Up The Human Body?

There are 206 bones in the human body. The exact number depends on how you count them. There are 47 bones in the human foot, so if you include both feet, there are 94 bones in the body.

What Is The Different Type Of Bones In The Human Body?

Head Bones

The human head is made up of the cranium and the face. The cranium is made up of the skullcap and the facial bones including the nose, jaw, ear, and eyes. The facial bones are also referred to as cranial bones.

Neck Bones

The human neck is made up of the vertebrae, sternum, and hyoid bone. The vertebrae are a series of bones that make up a series of rings in the spine. The sternum consists of four small bones that form a cup-like shape over the heart (the body’s main pumping muscle). The hyoid bone is a small bone found in front of the larynx, which is responsible for controlling swallowing (gulping).

Shoulder Bones

The shoulder is made up of three major bones: clavicle or collarbone, scapula or shoulder blade, and humerus or upper arm bone. The clavicle forms most of the shoulder and holds the shoulder blade in place. The scapula forms the shoulder blade and is held in place by tendons that connect to the humerus. The humerus is a long bone that runs from the shoulder to the elbow and provides stability for movements.

Leg Bones

The leg bones are made up of three major bones: tibia or shinbone, fibula or ankle bone, metatarsals or toes bones, and phalanges or finger bones. The tibia has a flat surface on top and is connected to the fibula by tendons. The metatarsals are two long bones that run from toe to heel along the foot’s sole. They are joined together at their bases by tendons, which create space for the toes to move freely within their sockets. The phalanges are small bones at either end of each finger (the fingers are made up of five phalanges). They allow movement between individual fingers and thumb as well as structure for the hand.

Arm Bones

The arm is made up of the humerus, radius, and ulna (two bones that make up the forearm). The humerus is a long bone that runs from the shoulder to the elbow and provides a structure for the hand. The radius is a short bone that runs from the elbow to the wrist and acts as a guide for some of the muscles in your forearm. The ulna is one of two bones in your forearm that helps move your fingers.

Forearm Bones

The forearms are made up of three major bones: the ulna and radius, which are the two bones that make up your forearm, and the humerus, which runs from the wrist to the elbow. The ulna is one of two bones in your forearm that helps move your fingers. The radius forms most of your forearm and acts as a guide for some of the muscles in your forearm. The humerus forms most of your upper arm as well as support for the upper arm and hand.

What Are The Functions Of Each Bone In The Human Body?

1. The Thoracic Cage

The thoracic cage is a structure that encloses the heart, lungs, diaphragm, and esophagus. It is made up of the following:

Thoracic cavity: This is the space that is left after cutting through the ribcage. It contains 2 major

parts: the chest cavity and the thoracic cavity.

Tension pneumothorax: It occurs when air leaks into a patient’s chest cavity through a hole in his/her lungs. This can be life-threatening.

Lungs: These are formed by ribs, cartilages, and muscles surrounding an area called ‘respiratory bronchioles’. They help to expand, contract, and move air around in our bodies.

Diaphragm: It’s a flat muscle that separates the chest cavity from the abdominal cavity (just like a curtain). It separates air from blood in our bodies so that we can breathe easily.

Esophagus: These are hollow tubes that run from the pharynx (throat) to the stomach. They are food- and drink-passing tubes in our bodies

2. The Abdominal Organ System

Abdomen is a term used to describe the structures attached to the thoracic cavity. It is made up of:

Digestive System: This is made up of a large number of organs and tissues that help us break down, absorb and use food and drink. These are also called the digestive tract or alimentary canal. These include the mouth, esophagus, stomach, small intestines, large intestines, rectum, and anus (also called the anal canal). 

Spleen: It’s a large organ that produces red blood cells for our bodies to carry oxygen around in them. It also makes white blood cells so that our bodies can fight off infections.

Kidneys: These are two bean-shaped organs located close to the abdomen on either side of the spine. They are used to filter out waste products from the blood and make urine.

Ureters: These are tubes that carry urine from the kidneys to the bladder.

Bladder: This is a hollow organ that stores urine until it is eliminated by passing it out of the body via urination. It’s made up of two portions: a small upper part and a larger lower part.

Pancreas: It’s an organ that helps to produce insulin, which regulates blood sugar levels in our bodies.

Liver: This is a large glandular organ in our abdomen that produces bile, which helps break down fats in our bodies and make them easier to absorb.

Gallbladder: It’s an organ that stores bile until it has been released into our stomachs when we eat food containing fat so that we can digest them properly.

3. The Pelvic Organ System

The pelvic organs include the reproductive system, portion, and a larger lower portion.

Uterus: This is a hollow, pear-shaped organ located in the center of the female pelvis. It’s made up of two parts: the body and the womb.

Ovaries: These are two oval-shaped organs that produce eggs (ova). They are located in the female pelvis near to uterus.

Fallopian tubes: These are slender tubes that connect ovaries to the uterus. They allow eggs to travel from ovaries into uterus during sexual reproduction.

Vagina: This is a muscular canal that connects the cervix (neck of the uterus) with the outside of the body through which we pass urine and menstrual blood, as well as pass babies during childbirth.

Cervix: This is a narrow tube at the top part of the uterus through which we pass urine and menstrual blood, as well as pass babies during childbirth. 

Labia majora: These are two large folds of skin on either side of a part called the bladder neck and a larger lower part called the bladder.

Uterus: These are two bean-shaped organs that lie just below the bladder and help to nurture a baby during pregnancy. They also produce hormones that help the body regulate its cycles.

Vagina: This is a tube-like structure that is formed by many folds of skin. It contains muscles and other tissues that allow it to expand, contract, and to move in ways necessary for sexual intercourse and childbirth.

4. The Pelvic Organ System

The pelvis is a term used for structures located between the abdomen and leg bones (femur, tibia, fibula). It’s made up of:

Genitals: These are structures located by each side of the pelvis that contains reproductive organs such as testicles, ovaries, or uterus (womb). These reproductive organs form male or female bodies in humans. 

The testes: Located on each side of the pel portion called the bladder neck, and a large lower portion called the bladder.

Urethra: This is a tube that carries urine from the bladder to the outside of the body. It’s a tube that allows us to pass urine from the bladder to the outside of the body.

Pelvis: It’s a large bone located between the legs between the hip bones and is made up of several

parts:  the pelvic bones, sacrum, coccyx (tailbone),  and other smaller bones. The pelvis is also known as the pelvic girdle or pelvic ring.

Conclusion

The human body is a fascinating machine. It’s made up of many intricately connected parts, all working together to produce the actions we take every day. There are many ways to answer this question, but one of the most interesting ways is by breaking down the human body into its individual bones.

Frances Umstead

Frances Umstead is a health & fitness writer with a passion for helping others reach their fitness goals. She has been featured in magazines and online publications such as Shape, Self, Huffington Post, and more. When she's not sweating it out at the gym or writing about health & fitness, Frances can be found reading a good book or spending time with her husband and pup.

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