Is Jerry Springer Show Staged

Is Jerry Springer Show Staged

‍You’d be forgiven for thinking the Jerry Springer show is staged. After all, who would ever behave so badly in real life? But watching an episode, it’s impossible to know for sure whether the guests are actors or not. There are several potential explanations for this, but we’ll consider three main ones here: Is the Jerry Springer show staged? Perhaps it is in part – but there’s a lot more to it than that.

Is Jerry Springer Show Staged?

Yes. It is staged. You can see that on the show. You can see the reactions of the guests, who are obviously rehearsed to react in certain ways. The show is very much like a play, with all the characters and their parts. The audience is meant to be entertained and not to think too deeply about it.

Producers Pay Guests To Appear

  • People who do not want to appear on the show are paid to not appear.
  • People who are on the show are paid to pretend they are being interviewed in front of a live audience when they know they are being filmed.
  • The people who do appear on the show, or the people who they know will appear, rehearse their reactions and lines ahead of time with the producers, and with each other.
  • The guests know that if they say something that is too controversial or outrageous or off-color, it will be edited out by the producers later, even if it is not edited out during taping (they have to get so many commercials in first).
  • The guests also know that if they act too nice or polite, it will be edited out by the producers later too (they have to get so many commercials in first).
  • They know that sometimes things said by guests during taping get cut out because of sponsors’ objections.
  • The show is run by a team of producers, all of whom are also lawyers.
  • The show is owned by one studio, which has many subsidiaries.
  • Each guest is interviewed in the studio by a producer and a lawyer before they go on the air. They are then filmed talking to each other and to the audience, with the audience playing along as if they were actually there at the event, even though they are not actually there at all.
  • The guests are not actually interviewed live before they go on air. They are interviewed in advance, and then the tape is edited together in post-production.
  • The show is controlled by the studio that owns it. The studio’s lawyers control what can be said and what can’t be said by the guests.
  • The show is owned by an international conglomerate, which owns many other television networks as well.
  • The show has a mafia-like reputation among some of its employees for being a very tough place to work (which it is).
  • The show has lots of sponsors, who pay large sums of money to appear on the show in exchange for advertising time during commercial breaks (which they do). They are also paid to sponsor certain products or services that are highlighted on the show, even if these products or services have nothing whatsoever to do with the topic being discussed at that time (which they sometimes do).

Jerry Springer Does Not Actually Host The Show

  1. He doesn’t really introduce guests.
  2. The show is produced around him and the guests are directed by the producers.
  3. Jerry Springer has no input into the content of the show, nor does he appear to have any influence over what happens on the show.
  4. The show is not a real interview show, where you have to pretend to be interested in what somebody has to say, or where you can’t ask them questions you don’t want to be answered.
  5. There are no live audience members on the show, so it’s not a real interview either (just like Jerry Springer isn’t really interviewing guests).
  6. The audience is not there for their entertainment or for them to give their opinion about what they see – they are there for Jerry Springer and his producers to make it look like they are entertaining an audience, when in fact all that is happening is that they are being used as props and actors) get paid to be there and b) pretend to be interested in what the guests have to say.
  7. The show is not a real talk show, where you have to pretend to be interested in what somebody has to say, or where you can’t ask them questions you don’t want answered.
  8. The audience is not there for their entertainment or for them to give their opinion about what they see – they are there for Jerry Springer and his producers to make it look like they are entertaining an audience, when in fact all that is happening is that they a) get paid to be there and b) pretend to be interested in what the guests have to say.
  9. There are no live audience members on the show, so it’s not a real interview either (just like Jerry Springer isn’t really interviewing guests).
  10. The guests are real people, but the show is scripted.

Conclusion

So, is the Jerry Springer show staged? Yes, in some ways, it absolutely is. Guests on the show do write their own stories, and the cameras do focus on them. But, as we’ve seen, this doesn’t mean that the show is fake or scripted in any significant way. It’s not as if there’s a script that the guests follow. Instead, guests are given an outline and encouraged to fill in the gaps. So, only in very small ways is the show staged – and in many other ways, it’s more realistic than most people think.

Joseph Manzano

Joseph Manzano is a business content writer with more than 10 years of experience crafting content for startups and small businesses. He has a knack for taking complex topics and making them easy to understand, and he enjoys writing about innovation, entrepreneurship, and marketing. When he's not working, Joseph can be found playing soccer or spending time with his wife and two young children.

Latest from Blog

Do Bat Bites Itch

Bats are not known for being cuddly or cute. In popular culture, they’re often portrayed as